Focusing on Proficiency in the Novice Level Foreign Language Classroom

Thanks to OWL (Organic World Language) for really driving home the importance of focusing on language proficiency. I love the ACTFL Can-Do Statements, but they are not always kid-friendly. I have modified them to be more age appropriate for my 1st, 2nd and 3rd graders (ages 6-8).

Focusing on Proficiency in the Novice Level Language Classroom (French, Spanish) wlteacher.wordpress.comIn the past I assessed them on vocabulary blocks, but this year the focus is on proficiency. Just a small change in approach is all it takes. Rather than listing fruits, tell me the ones that you like and don’t like. Instead of listing all the animals you know, choose a few of your favorites and describe where they live. Instead of responding to my greetings, have a conversation with a classmate.

Focusing on Proficiency in the Novice Level Language Classroom (French, Spanish) wlteacher.wordpress.comStudents will decide when they are ready to show proficiency and will put a sticker on the statement when they demonstrate that they can do it. One sticker is all it will take to motivate the whole gang. My guess is that some of the 2nd graders will want to do some of the 3rd grade prompts…all the better. These prompts should get them to Novice Mid or even further by the end of 3rd grade.

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7 responses to “Focusing on Proficiency in the Novice Level Foreign Language Classroom

  1. You should share again with some stickers added! Excited to hear more about this.

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  2. Pingback: World Language Classroom Resources

  3. This is great!! Do the “1e”, “2e”, etc. correspond to novice low, mid, high or something else? Is this all within one unit?

    Thank you for sharing!

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  4. I love this idea! I teach Spanish for Spanish Speakers 9th-12th grade and this would really work to motivate my kids. Since, each year I get students at various levels in the language enrolled in the same class, I’m thinking on individualizing it a little more and putting names rather than stickers, so that each student is working toward mastery, but at their own level and pace. Thanks for sharing!

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