10 Ways to Use Task Cards in the Foreign Language Classroom

Teachers are always looking for new and inventive ways to make vocabulary and verb form/tense practice more engaging, communicative and proficiency-based in the foreign language class.  We are all seeing task cards come up in Internet searches and rightfully so because they are a very effective way of accomplishing our goals for students. Task cards are particularly useful because they provide lots of opportunities for hands-on activities and movement in the classroom.

10 Ways to us Task Cards in the Foreign (World) Language Classroom (French, Spanish) wlteacher.wordpress.comHere are my top 10 ways to use task cards in the foreign language classroom.

  1. Warm-Ups (Do Nows): When they enter the room, students choose 2 or 3 cards and complete the prompt.
  2. Fast Finishers: Students that finish another activity early can choose a few of the cards and complete the prompts.10 Ways to us Task Cards in the Foreign (World) Language Classroom (French, Spanish) wlteacher.wordpress.com
  3. Exit Ticket: Just before the end of class hand out a task card to each student and they respond to the prompt and hand it to the teacher (who verifies the answer) as they leave the room.
  4. Station Activity: Divide the cards up into different areas (stations) around the room put students into groups. Give student or group a task card response sheet. When groups finish the cards at the station, groups rotate to a new station.  10 Ways to us Task Cards in the Foreign (World) Language Classroom (French, Spanish) wlteacher.wordpress.com
  5. Scoot: Place a task card on each desk. Each student gets a response sheet. Students answer the question on the task card and then “scoot” to the next desk until they have rotated all around the room. Set a timer to complete the prompt. You can also put several cards on each desk for students to complete. They can either complete them all in one round or rotate back to that desk to complete the additional cards.
  6. Differentiation: Assign students specific cards that respond to their current abilities with the material.10 Ways to us Task Cards in the Foreign (World) Language Classroom (French, Spanish) wlteacher.wordpress.com
  7. Back to Back: Give a pair of students the same task card to answer. They sit or stand with their backs against each other. Students read and complete the prompt at the same time when the signal is given to begin. This works best when answers are written on mini white boards. The first to answer correctly gets a point. This can be done with two big teams with one team member coming up to compete against a member from the other team, or in small groups of 3, with two students competing and one judging.
  8. Traditional Board Games: Combine the task cards with traditional game boards and have students complete a task card to be able to move.10 Ways to us Task Cards in the Foreign (World) Language Classroom (French, Spanish) wlteacher.wordpress.com
  9. Quiz Games: Play games like Jeopardy and use the task card as prompts and questions.
  10. Interactive Bulletin Board: Put task cards on a bulletin board or around the room. Assign individual students 8-10 numbers. If done during class students can circulate and write the answers on a response sheet. This can also be done as a homework assignment.

You can read how how Emile, the Island Teacher, uses task cards on her blog post.

Advertisements

5 responses to “10 Ways to Use Task Cards in the Foreign Language Classroom

  1. Pingback: French Verb Form and Vocabulary Task Cards | World Language Classroom Resources

  2. Pingback: Spanish Verb Form and Vocabulary Task Cards | World Language Classroom Resources

  3. Pingback: Hide and Speak (or Write): Foreign Language Activity to Practice Speaking and Writing | World Language Classroom Resources

  4. Pingback: Staying Up-To-Date in the Changing-World of Foreign Language Teaching | World Language Classroom

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s